The More Things Change, The More They Stay The Same…

Posted by on Nov 3, 2014 in Blog | No Comments

In the 1960’s, there was a strong backlash against heroin usage, which exploded as opium from the mid-east was sold to Western military personnel in Vietnam. Subsequently, some of the more enterprising personnel got rich trafficking the narcotic from Vietnam (via military transport in some instances) to the United States.

As young people took to this and other drugs as a means towards finding themselves or, following Timothy Leary, expanding their minds. The answer, as the television commercial below intended, was to scare the [FILL-IN-THE-BLANK] out of America’s youngsters:

 

 

What may surprise you is that opium addiction didn’t start in the 1950’s or 1960’s. The earliest reference to opium growth and use is in 3,400 B.C. when the opium poppy was cultivated in lower Mesopotamia (Southwest Asia).

Back in 1932, Cab Calloway sang a song about opium (the core component in heroin as well as prescription drugs Oxycontin and Vicodin) addiction (colloquially referred to as “kicking the gong around”).

 

 

In the era of crack pipes and wacky weed in the vapor huffer, it is interesting that opium is still en vogue. It was the drug that took talented actor Phillip Seymour Hoffman (among others) away from his fans. It is not just on the periphery of society, but another lifestyle choice for the rich and famous.

Essex County Veterans Courthouse in Newark NJAnother thing about heroin is that is on the verge of making an even greater resurgence. Law enforcement is on its toes, trying to prevent another generation of junkies.

And now… for the punch line.

A man was brought into the Essex County Veterans Courthouse in Newark, New Jersey on drug-related charges. Logically, if one is arrested on drug-related charges… one would not have drugs on his person when visiting the courthouse. So, guess what was found on him?

Wait for it…

In his underwear were six envelopes of heroin. And, he was apparently surprised that he was caught. Each envelope had the word “EBOLA” stamped on the exterior… in red ink. Because, Ebola is so scary, it was apparently expected to prevent drug-sniffing dogs from finding it.

confused boy

N’est-ci pas?

 

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